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5 Reasons You Should Attend The 40 Percent Symposium on 3rd Nov

EVORA is delighted to be co-hosting the 7th Annual 40 Percent Symposium, taking place on Thursday 3rd November 2016 at the Regent Hotel in Berlin.

Since the first event in London in 2011, The 40 Percent Symposium has established itself as the leading resource for those working in sustainability within the commercial real estate sector, focusing specifically on the impact that sustainability has on the value of commercial property.

Its mission is to bring its delegates the latest thinking on sustainability in commercial real estate investment, occupation and ownership.

Here are five reasons you should attend this year’s Symposium…

 

1. Return to Germany

This year marks a welcome return of the 40 Percent Symposium to Germany, after having been held in London in 2015. As Germany continues to be a world leader in both the renewable energy sector and sustainable policymaking, Berlin seems like a natural host city for this year’s Symposium.

Discover a bit about the Regent Berlin.

 

2. New Hosts & Organisers Reinvigorating the Event

One of the biggest changes to this year’s Symposium is that it has brand new co-hosts and organisers; our German consultancy partner, ES EnviroSustain, and us!

Here’s what my colleague and Managing Partner at ES EnviroSustain, Dr. Birgit Memminger-Rieve, has to say about this year’s Symposium:

“We are very excited to reinvigorate the event this year and to bring it back to Germany, where the Symposium has always attracted the leaders from the European commercial real estate sector, gaining continuously excellent feedback.

We are also delighted to give our Symposium an even more international and also practical focus with our Best Practice session in the afternoon, when we will be welcoming experts from Sponda (Finland), Vasakronan (Sweden), deematrix and Grundfos (both Germany), and Sonae Sierra (Portugal) just to name a few.”

Learn more about the Symposium and its organisers.

 

3. Hear From 15 Guest Speakers

This year’s Symposium has some excellent speakers lined up, including Martin Brühl from Union Investment and Thies Grothe from ZIA in our Politics Session, which will look at Europe’s way to carbon neutrality for the real estate sector.

Our second session will look at not only the risks, but also the multiple opportunities for the sector. We are delighted to welcome Whitney Austin Gray from the United States to talk about health and wellbeing for building users, and Lonneke Löwik from the Netherlands to give you some insights about GRESB and how it can help to better manage all aspects of sustainability.

View all 15 Guest Speakers.

 

4. An Engaging, Cutting-Edge Agenda

This year’s Symposium will identify how and if the sustainability discussion/hype around 2007-2011 has found its way into the daily business procedures of investors, landlords, and project developers.  Focusing on three core sessions of politics, economics & risks and global best practice, with a keynote address from Martin Brühl, Managing Director of Union Investment and RICS Past President 2015/2016, as well as packed agenda of industry leaders, sharing their insight on the future and best practice of sustainability in commercial real estate.

View the full agenda.

 

5. Network With Your Peers From Across Europe

And last but not least… The Symposium is well-known for being an excellent opportunity to meet with colleagues, learn from each other’s experiences, and make new acquaintances.

The format of the conference encourages open and informal discussion between industry leaders on the key topics impacting the industry. Key trends and new best practices are highlighted, enabling investors, portfolio owners and project developers to make decisions that will ensure that the investments and acquisitions made in the present, will deliver profit and value going forward, whilst continuing to be sustainable.

“To come to a 40 Percent Symposium is to join a committed and thoughtful audience of like-minded property and investment professionals who understand the need to deliver a sustainable future in property.”

John Pike, 40 Percent Symposium Founder


Register your attendance today!

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2016 GRESB Results Day!

GRESB results are out today.

Visit our GRESB support service page.

In 2016, there were 759 entries covering 63 countries. The gross asset value of companies and funds reporting was $2.8 trillion.

Here at EVORA, we’re working hard to review our client results and analyse progress against previous submissions. Findings are positive, reflecting work done by our clients to improve ESG policies and practices and to strengthen data collection through use of our SIERA software platform.

Our findings appear to reflect UK wide results. The average GRESB Score of UK companies and funds improved from 58 in 2015 to 63 in 2016. Furthermore, GRESB states that companies and funds in the UK continue to outperform those in Europe (although Australia and New Zealand lead with an overall score of 74).

An initial review of overall performance data is also interesting. A like-for-like reduction in energy consumption of 0.67% was reported in the UK (0.96% in Europe). Carbon emissions fell by 3.6% (0.6% in Europe) and water consumption also fell by 1.33% (0.7% Europe).

We will provide more detail and measured analysis of GRESB results in due course. Stay tuned, and don’t forget to subscribe to our updates by using the form in the sidebar.


EVORA is a GRESB Premier Partner.

This year, our software SIERA delivered the automation of data transfer into GRESB for 41 submissions and more than €20bn of assets, with clients including Deutsche Asset Management, Schroder Real Estate, Rockspring, and AEW.

To talk to us about GRESB or to request a demo of SIERA, please don’t hesitate to get in touch.


 

Further reading on GRESB and SIERA:

 


GRESB Premier PartnerAs a GRESB Real Estate Premier Partner, we are perfectly positioned to provide GRESB support. View our official Premier Partner profile.

We can work with you to complete the submission and understand your scoring, as well as develop a sustainability plan that will improve your future GRESB performance and align with your organisation’s key environmental objectives.

Health and Wellbeing – The Next ‘Sustainability’?

As a society, more and more of us are adopting city lifestyles and increasingly spending a greater proportion of our time inside (an estimated 90% of our day inside buildings), without thinking too much about how we interact with those buildings and vice-versa.

Along comes the concept of ‘health and wellbeing.’ A phrase that initially sounds insubstantial to most, but has been established by a rush of recent research discussing the benefits it can bring to building occupiers. With the likes of GRESB, UKGBC, WELL conducting research, quantifying and discussing health and wellbeing, this looks to be the next big topic grabbing business’ attention. We look to see where the value lies in businesses adopting health and wellbeing, or whether this is just the next hollow buzzword across the industry.

So, what does this all mean? Health and wellbeing revolves around two basic principles:

  • Altering building aspects (e.g. daylight, air quality, thermal control community space) for a more productive work environment. Shown in Figure 1 as the ‘physiological’ factors, altering the ways which our body reacts to the environment it is in.
  • The incorporation of operational schemes into working environments (flexible working, learning opportunities). The ‘psychological’ aspects, those that affect our mental attitude in the working environment.
Health and Wellbeing Blog 1 - Image via Wellbriefing, Atkins

Figure 1: Atkins (2016) ‘Wellbriefing – About Wellbeing’. Source below.

The case for Health and Wellbeing

1. Financial Value

One of the main arguments in favour of the concept is the general acceptance that most of us are more productive working in well-lit, thermally comfortable offices with good air quality as opposed to dark, dingy spaces – with this improved workspace encouraging the greater productivity of staff and, in turn, generating greater returns from staff.

With staff costs typically accounting for around 90% of overall operating costs (Figure 2 below), maintaining employee productivity through health and wellbeing measures can provide substantial monetary value for all businesses, regardless of size.

Health and Wellbeing Blog 2 - Image via World GBC

Figure 2: World Green Building Council (2014) ‘Health, Wellbeing and Productivity in Offices’. Source below.

2. Health and Welfare

Perhaps a fairly obvious point to most of us, but the correlation between health and happiness is an aspect that should not be overlooked for the value it can bring to businesses. Healthier staff are typically associated with lower levels of absenteeism, deductions in sickness leave and higher retention levels in the jobs/buildings which enhance this (PwC UK, 2008).

3. Attract Talent and Business

This is more of a long-term influence. While improvements can be made to the satisfaction levels and retention of current employees and tenants, aspects such as the incorporation of community space, ergonomic work spaces and transport links (which are all associated as health and wellbeing metrics) are also considered as attractive ‘pull factors’ for work environments – attracting new staff and clients to businesses/buildings.

Accreditation

While research into health and wellbeing metrics is increasingly conducted, criticism arises in the lack of tangible ways to measure the progress of improvement measures put into place. While building aspects provide an easier method of measurement (for example, air quality samples can be regularly taken with IAQ meters); operational schemes, such as additional community space, are not so easily measured.

And so comes the introduction of the WELL Standard. A scheme developed by Delos, after 7 years of research, to add a measure, best practice and a benchmark to the concept. The standard is lengthy – 238 pages – covering the seven core aspects of air, water, nourishment, light, fitness, comfort and mind. While the adoption of the WELL Standard has been slow in the UK, with only 4 registered WELL projects, its outlook to provide a measurement to this increasingly discussed topic will undoubtedly see that is acts as a major player in this growing field.

Who are the real drivers?

With a number of benefits being thrown around by many, excitement is growing for this new up-and-coming trend – but where is this excitement coming from? Health and wellbeing is a principle that is driven by and for building occupiers and, with many occupants never giving any thought to the concept before, it could be that the missing link to this all is engagement with tenants throughout the process.

To date, health and wellbeing is typically only driven through large institutions, who generally view the trend as another way to differentiate the services they provide. This raises questions to the practical relevance of health and wellbeing – if changes in associated aspects/schemes will be relevant across a multitude of building dynamics and to SME’s, as well as large institutions.

Looking ahead…

At present, health and well-being is held back by a number of questions surrounding the tangible ways to measure and monitor attributed aspects and the practical relevance of the trend. While aspects such as access to exercise and the abundance of community space are consistently mentioned as key attributes to consider for health and well-being improvements, the psychological improvements which these bring to individuals are hard to monitor progress on. Buildings are also extremely dynamic, adding further complications in the lack of a ‘one model fits all’ approach.

Ultimately, the key issue continues to be – who is health and wellbeing for? Is this truly a no-brainer that all institutions should incorporate or is this just another case of an emerging buzzword with little substance? However important, health and wellbeing is an emerging trend throughout the industry that should not be ignored in passing and one which EVORA will continue to engage with, through our consultancy and market-leading sustainability software SIERA.

EVORA Office Window

Improving our air quality with the windows open in the EVORA office – shame the trains disrupt our noise levels!

Read More


 

If you have any questions about Health and Wellbeing, SIERA, or any other topics mentioned in this blog, please don’t hesitate to get in touch.


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SIERA Features and Benefits [Infographic]

With its many advanced capabilities, it’s not a straightforward task to summarise the SIERA features and benefits to just five apiece… But we’ve tried anyway!

SIERA (Sustainability Intelligence Environmental Reporting & Analysis) is our proprietary sustainability management software that has been developed specifically for the commercial real estate investment market. It is already managing billions of pounds worth of real estate, and is being rapidly adopted by large organisations across the globe.

This year alone, SIERA has delivered the automation of data transfer into GRESB for 23 submissions and more than €20bn of assets, with clients including Deutsche Asset Management, Schroder Real Estate, Rockspring, and AEW.

Explore the infographic below to see SIERA’s 5 Key Features and Benefits. (Click the image to zoom in.)

SIERA Features and Benefits

To find out how SIERA completely transforms your data capture and reporting, speak to our experts today and request a demo.


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Recapping The Energy Institute’s ‘Energy Management-Meeting the Standard’ Conference

Attending conferences can sometimes be a hit and miss affair in this industry. After frequenting a few of these events, both in my current role as a sustainability consultant and in my previous career as an environmental manager in the construction sector, I am all too wary of how easily these events can turn into a series of sales pitches provided by various companies presenting.

I needn’t have worried, the conference, run by the Energy Institute, involved a series of half hour talks from various sectors on a wide variety of energy related topics, all of which were 100% relevant to EVORA and more importantly, our clients.

The talks provided valuable snapshots of the great work being undertaken under the umbrella of energy efficiency and also provided some solid information on the impacts of regulations and policies.

Here is a summary of key points.

 

Article 8 Across Europe

Dr Martin Krusker of Siemens was asked, “who has implemented the requirements of Article 8 the best across Europe?”

Answer, the UK. The opinion of ESOS across the UK varies widely (some organisations considered it a pure legal compliance requirement whilst others saw a real opportunity to drive improvement) and, as a result, I was not expecting this response. From my experience, I felt that many of the smaller organisations just captured by the scheme found it a burden. There is also the issue, the white elephant in the room, that nobody has to action anything identified within ESOS audits….

The Environment Agency were consistently vocal in their opinion that thousands of businesses were going to be non-compliant – even though, as far as I’m aware there have been no penalties served, as yet, on these businesses.

However, it seems that in comparison to the remainder of Europe the UK did a stand-out job. Nevertheless, it is clear we should not rest on our achievements, there is plenty to improve upon during the next compliance phase.

 

Progression with ISO50001

The ISO50001 Standard is to undergo review to align with the high level structure of other recently revised standards (ISO14001:2015 and ISO9001:2015). The expectation is that this will be issued in January 2019 with a three-year implementation period.  If you want to get involved in the process of re-drafting the ISO50001 Standard, keep your eyes peeled for further updates on the EVORA website.

In Germany there is a tax incentive scheme for businesses which introduce ISO50001. Take-up of ISO50001 in Germany is therefore much higher than the rest of the world, Germany on its own accounts for more than 50% of all ISO50001 certifications. With Germany already being ahead of the UK in terms of renewable energy and pro-active energy policies it is yet another example of innovative policy making that results in German companies taking more responsibility in managing their energy consumption. I hope someday that the UK government will take as positive a stance as their German counterparts.

 

Energy Markets and Private Wire Systems

Talking about energy market costs culminated in a discussion on the potential of private wire systems to negate the continual rise of energy cost ‘add-ons’.

Historically, energy costs were made up of 60% the actual cost of a unit of energy with 40% added on for extras such as availability charges, demand charges, feed in tariff, climate change levy, distribution costs and so on. However, we are now moving to a point where this proportion is reversed, with 60% of energy costs being from ‘add-ons’, therefore the fluctuation in the actual cost of energy is making up less than half of the total cost of energy.

A private wire system removes these ‘add-ons’. Although only generally applicable to large demand energy users located in feasible areas, the opportunity to tap into local renewable energy projects in order to save costs and use a renewable supply is becoming an attractive option to some. This could become a viable option for some businesses if the proportion of ‘add-ons’ in energy costs continue to grow towards an unsustainable level.

 

Thoughts for the Future

These were just three of many talking points of the day. Although the next ESOS compliance deadline may seem like a distant worry, this event served as a reminder of the importance in determining how you can get the best out of a proactive energy management strategy (and value for money!)

However, as sustainability professionals we must lead by example and the venue was a timely reminder that there really is a long way to go before sustainability is naturally embedded. The conference room included multiple large halogen lights giving off vast amounts of heat combatted by huge industrial fans for cooling leading to a stuffy energy intensive bubble. A considerable faux pas for an energy management conference! Additionally, the travel information provided prior to the event listed detailed car directions, car parking facilities and airport links (with details of taxi journey lengths) before even mentioning train or bus options. Without joined up thinking and understanding, sustainability will never become the norm.

The event lasted for a day, but the topics discussed will be key themes in the sustainability arena for years to come.

For information on the services EVORA can provide please do not hesitate to get in touch today.


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The UK voted to leave the European Union: What next for the sustainable built environment?

The UK has voted to leave the European Union and significant changes are set to take place for the sustainable built environment. The landscape is uncertain and the scale and reach of the impacts are still unclear.

It is necessary to identify and minimise the risks presented by the economic and political uncertainty. Nonetheless, the business case for sustainability should not be side-lined.

Major transformations in environmental policy are expected. The legislative landscape will be crucial for supporting the established link between property value and sustainability performance. Legislation linked to the EU Energy Performance of Buildings Directive (EPBD) are expected to be affected the most. This includes the Display Energy Certificates (DECs) and the Energy Savings Opportunity Scheme, which are linked to the Energy Efficiency Directive (EED).

The future is complex and there will be many opportunities and risks. Our main objective is to keep our clients informed and provide the most appropriate support, foster collaboration and help raise the business case for sustainability.

If you have any questions or would like to discuss any sustainability issues, please contact our experts today, who will be happy to advise you on the best course of action.

 

Photo: Gary Ullah Flick Creative Commons

 


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Why MEES is Changing Behaviour Two Years Ahead of the Compliance Date

The Minimum Energy Efficiency Standards (MEES) regulations will make it unlawful from April 2018 to let buildings in England and Wales which do not achieve a minimum Energy Performance Certificate (EPC) rating of E. This will initially apply to new lettings and renewals only, but from 2023 will apply to all existing leases as well.

John Alker, Director of Policy and Communications at the UKGBC stated that MEES is “The single most significant piece of legislation to affect our existing building stock in a generation”. I would certainly agree with this on a number of levels.

 

But doesn’t MEES have its flaws?

YES!

Firstly, the minimum standard is based on an EPC rating but as we know, EPCs are renowned for their lack of correlation to actual energy performance and that, as a commoditised service, quality diminished significantly putting into question the accuracy and usefulness of many EPCs.  Note that the Government is aware of this issue and has entered into a consultation process designed to improve quality assurance of EPC assessments.

Secondly, EPC calculations are linked to building regulations, so as regulations get tougher, so does the ability to achieve a decent rating making MEES a moving target. Many have suggested that EPCs produced pre 2011, if re-modelled now, could be up to two ratings lower. If correct, this could potentially see in excess of 30% of building stock, at risk to 2018 regulations.

However, this is not what we are experiencing, primarily due to the poor quality of many existing EPCs. As an example, EVORA recently re-evaluated shopping centre units with an EPC ratings E – G, where the rental value of these units exceeded 75% of the total ERV of the scheme. The original EPCs were of poor quality, as shown through the use of defaults. By completing accurate EPCs, EVORA was able to secure at least a D rating and therefore mitigating MEES risks for the next 10 years.

It is also not yet clear what the future trajectory will be for the minimum standard, although it is possible that this will be raised come 2023. This makes refurbishment planning challenging for landlords, who generally work on ten year cycles.

Finally, there are a number of exemptions, not least the requirement to have the consent all of tenants, which is surely a get out of jail free card for any landlord.

MEES and Behavioural Change

Despite these flaws and challenges we are seeing a significant change in behaviour well in advance of the 2018 compliance date. This shouldn’t be a surprise. MEES has the real potential to adversely impact many key value drivers including occupancy, rental growth, liquidity, cost of finance and yield on sale.

 

Greater Rigour Required

As such, it is focusing minds to ensure EPCs are carried out professionally and with rigour, whilst taking steps to understand portfolio risk supported by an appropriate strategy to mitigate.

As an example, more sophisticated energy modelling is being undertaken using Dynamic Simulation software packages to ensure the accuracy of EPCs and to better understand the opportunities to improve both energy performance and the EPC rating. We are currently supporting Hines on a major refurbishment in Canary Wharf, providing energy simulation modelling to ensure the design intent improves both the energy efficiency of the building as well as the EPC rating.

 

Understanding your MEES Risk

In addition, we are regularly using sophisticated sustainability management software such as SIERA on behalf of our clients, to analyse EPC ratings, lease events and ERVs together to understand and profile MEES risk.

 

SIERA Infographic 1 JPG

 

Collaboration is going to be Essential

Ironically, rather than being a get out of jail free card, lack of consent by the occupiers, possibly due to business interruption issues, could impact on asset management plans to improve the overall EPC rating to ensure future marketability and to prevent possible price chipping on sale. This is also an issue for FRI assets where there is no legal right to gain access, but improvements may be necessary to achieve a minimum rating, prior to lease expiry to enable the property to be marketed to minimise the risk of void periods. These issues will drive the need for greater collaboration between landlord and tenant.

 

Improvement vs repairing obligations and what about dilapidations…?

Collaboration will also be key if the landlord intends to replace M&E equipment with more energy efficient kit, ahead of the end of its useful life, and is seeking the tenants to share in the costs or to recover fully through the service charge. The cost benefits to the tenants will need to be clearly articulated to get their engagement.

Staying on the theme of replacing kit, this is likely to have an impact on dilapidations where the landlord may require more energy efficient equipment to meet MEES regulations but the issue of improvement vs repairing obligations will arise. Again, collaboration and forward discussions will be key.

 

New lease terms?

New lease terms (notice my omission of ‘green’ which generally makes tenants and letting agents run a mile) could become the norm, specifically to bar alterations that adversely affect an EPC rating. But policing such terms will be a challenge.  Does this, for example, mean that every planned tenant fit-out or even minor alteration, has to be fully modelled to assess the impact on the EPC rating – possibly.

There are many other issues and challenges associated with the impending MEES legislation and whilst it is far from perfect it offers an opportunity to improve the energy efficiency and resilience of your assets and engage in long term communication and collaboration with your tenants. Surely that can’t be a bad thing!

 

How can EVORA support you?

EVORA can support you in understanding the upcoming MEES regulations, help you profile your MEES risk using our sustainability management software, SIERA and provide professional support in delivering and improving the EPC ratings for your assets.

EVORA is participating in a select group to provide industry guidance to DECC on the future of MEES regulations.

 

For further information or guidance on MEES please contact Ed Gabbitas: egabbitas@evoraglobal.com or 07557 529 106

 


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EU Referendum and the Environment: The Final Few Days

On Thursday the 23rd of June, the UK will decide on its membership of the European Union. Thus far, it has been a closely fought debate with arguments presented by the Brexit and Remain campaigns. One key discussion point is the future of the legislative landscape for the environmental sector. This touches on the built environment and wildlife, as well as climate change targets. On the whole, there is consensus that voters lacked information throughout the period leading up to the referendum to take sustainability and the environmental issues into account.

Drawing on a survey of key professionals within the industry, the latest webinar held by the Institute of Environmental Management and Assessment (IEMA) suggested that:

  • Sustainability professionals thought the EU provides greater stability for environmental policy;
  • The UK is a leader on environmental and climate change policy;
  • The EU presents opportunities for the circular economy and fosters collaboration

In a similar way, the Institute of European Environmental Policy (IEEP) concluded in its latest report, “Potential Policy and Environmental Implications for the UK of a departure from the EU” that the UK’s environmental policy has been partly influenced by its EU membership. The IEEP argued that Brexit would trigger uncertainty unless the UK had alternatives in place. Going forward, the UK will need to review its environmental policy and significant transformations are set to take place.

The legislative landscape will be crucial to spur investment within the industry. In relation to real estate, links between property value and sustainability performance have already been established and this realisation will be further supported through environmental legislation. The UK Green Building Council (UK-GBC) has recently commented on the possible impacts of the outcome of the EU referendum, with those requirements linked to the EU Energy Performance of Buildings Directive (EPBD) expected to be affected the most. This includes the Display Energy Certificates (DECs) and the Energy Savings Opportunity Scheme, which are linked to the Energy Efficiency Directive (EED).

What is most certain are the unknown consequences of the EU referendum. Environmental and climate change consequences for the built environment and relevant legislation will be key areas of change.

Burns et al (2016) presents a summary of the scenarios and uncertainty levels. It is clear that the leave scenario presents the greatest uncertainty, with the potential of key transformations in the UK’s environmental policy. It seems that sustainability professionals must await on the side-lines as the debate draws to a close.

 

Table 1 The EU Referendum and the UK Environment (Burns et al, 2016)

EU Ref

 

Whatever the outcome, specific legislation within the UK, such as the Minimum Energy Efficiency Standard (MEES) coupled with the potential of a reformed legislative landscape means that all businesses operating within the built environment must be prepared for all eventualities. Sustainability and productivity within the built environment are valued globally not least in the business sense, but on a social level as well.

As for EVORA, regardless of the outcome, we are well positioned to navigate our clients through the post-EU referendum environment. With offices in the UK and Europe and a depth of knowledge within the industry, we will continue to help our clients manage their risks and realise the business case for sustainability.

If you have any questions or would like to discuss any sustainability issues, please contact our experts today, who will be happy to advise you on the best course of action.

 

Links:

http://www.iema.net/event-reports/2016/06/16/the-environment-and-the-eu-referendum/

http://www.ieep.eu/assets/2000/IEEP_Brexit_2016.pdf

http://ukandeu.ac.uk/wp-content/uploads/2016/04/Executive-summary-EU-referendum-UK-environment.pdf

Burns, C., A. Jordan, V. Gravey, N. Berny, S. Bulmer, N. Carter, R. Cowell, J. Dutton, B. Moore S. Oberthür, S. Owens, T. Rayner, J. Scott and B. Stewart (2016) The EU Referendum and the UK Environment: An Expert Review. How has EU membership affected the UK and what might change in the event of a vote to Remain or Leave? Executive Summary

http://www.ukgbc.org/news/uk-gbc-comment-eu-referendum

 

(Photo: Rock Cohen, Flickr Creative Commons)

 


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Leading Sustainability Software, SIERA, Automates GRESB Reporting For Second Year Running

SIERA, our market-leading web-based sustainability management software, is delivering massive efficiencies again this year in the reporting of the GRESB performance indicator data.

Visit our GRESB support service page.

Sophisticated modelling capability in SIERA simplifies the GRESB reporting process enormously, pushing out both the Performance Indicator reports in standard GRESB format as well as producing the GRESB Asset Report, which can be interfaced directly into the GRESB portal, eliminating the need for laborious and time consuming manual intervention and data input.

In 2015, SIERA was one of the few technology platforms directly transferring data into the GRESB portal. This year will see SIERA delivering the automation of data transfer into GRESB for 41 submissions and more than €20bn of assets, with clients including Deutsche Asset Management, Schroder Real Estate, Rockspring, and AEW.

Charlotte Jacques, Head of Sustainability, Schroder Real Estate comments:

“We chose SIERA because it has been specifically designed for the commercial real estate investment market.

It is practical and intuitive to use and helps simplify the many complexities of sustainability analysis and reporting, especially GRESB.”

SIERA is EVORA’s proprietary sustainability software, uniquely developed specifically for the real estate investment market. The software supports in the delivery of a number of regulatory and voluntary reporting requirements including CRC, GRESB, INREV and EPRA, as well as providing broader environmental and energy monitoring and performance analysis at both portfolio and asset level.

Our role as strategic sustainability advisors to real estate firms means that our insight has focused the development of SIERA to be finely tuned to our clients’ needs and changing market trends, making it a unique and practical product for the real estate sector.

As GRESB Premier Partners, for both our pan-European sustainability consultancy and technology platform, we are able to provide our clients with the best possible support in the completion of their GRESB survey.

To learn more about SIERA and how it would completely transform your sustainability data capture and reporting, please do not hesitate to get in touch today.


GRESB Premier PartnerAs a GRESB Real Estate Premier Partner, we are perfectly positioned to provide GRESB support. View our official Premier Partner profile.

We can work with you to complete the submission and understand your scoring, as well as develop a sustainability plan that will improve your future GRESB performance and align with your organisation’s key environmental objectives.

Legal Update: Scotland’s Energy Efficiency Programme

Changes to Scottish Energy Performance in Building Regulations

Publicity surrounding the introduction of Minimum Energy Efficiency Standards (MEES), which set a minimum EPC rating of E for leasing of properties from April 2018, has increased significantly in recent months, and rightly so. However, the Scottish Government has chosen to implement a different approach to drive energy performance improvement in buildings.

The Scottish Government has released guidance on the practical implementation of Section 63 of the Climate Change (Scotland) Act 2009 relating to the energy performance of existing non-domestic buildings.

The regulations, which come into force on 1 September 2016, require the production of a building specific energy Action Plan on the majority of buildings offered for sale or lease, which exceed 1000m².

The Action Plan, which is based on the output of Energy Performance Certificate (EPC) assessments, must be prepared by an approved Section 63 Advisor. Existing EPC assessors will need to complete further training and development to become approved advisors.

The Action Plan will identify appropriate measures to reduce energy consumption. Official guidance also indicates that the area threshold (currently 1000m2) is likely to drop over time. Following completion of the Action Plan, building owners will be responsible for either the reporting of annual energy use (in the form of a Display Energy Certificates (DEC) in England and Wales) or the implementation of physical improvement measures within a 3.5 year period.

Our EPC assessment team is already working to ensure it can provide Section 63 Advisor support.

Click the image to download this article as a handy one-page flyer.

Screen Shot 2016-08-01 at 09.56.43

 


For further information on regulations and requirements please contact Paul Sutcliffe: psutcliffe@evoraglobal.com or 07557 529 104.

Further information is available on – http://www.gov.scot/section63


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